Sarah Short Circuit

Heal, Nourish, Nurture

Category: Stories (page 1 of 3)

Alice’s story

“She was convinced that she was communicating with her baby and the baby could communicate with her,” Barrett said. “The baby was part of her delusions and that is where the risk arose.”

Source: Antiques expert was restrained days before death, inquest told | Society | The Guardian

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

Jessica’s story

I have heard of the baby blues, but this is something else altogether; this feels like the baby black and blues. This feels like oblivion.

People always ask me if I knew what was happening when I had postpartum psychosis. The truth is that I was painfully aware of what was happening. Until I started taking medication, and felt numbed, completely zombified, and lost two weeks of my life, I felt everything, and was utterly powerless to stop it or stem the irrepressible torment of my illness.

 The horror of what we went through cannot be denied, but I also want to share the tremendous love, growth and power that such a journey can engender.

The tremors of the psychotic quake still resonate throughout our lives three years later.

Source: Postpartum psychosis: ‘I’m a thing possessed, an animal. I am nearly sectioned twice’ | Life and style | The Guardian

 Read more of Jessica’s story on BBC Radio and her blog Mutha Courage.

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

The Lessons from Perfectionism

So many of the pains in our world can be traced back to one simple concept – perfectionism. The idea that everything has to be ‘perfect’ to be right. In this episode, author, TedX speaker, mental mental health advocate and mama Lisa Abramson talks about her own struggles with perfectionism, and how it led her to a psychiatric hospital… and back to herself. – Happy Mama with Amy Tayor-Kabbaz.

Become so unwell, I went from normal baby blues and mood swings, some normal adjustment, trouble coping with being a new mum, lack of sleep, the hormones, the stress of trying to breastfeed… it felt like the world was ending and I as soon as I become a mum I had failed at everything I was supposed to be doing.

I wanted to know why did this happen to me? How did I make it happen? Was it my fault? What did I do wrong? This was a challenging part of the recovery getting over that and letting go, and saying sometimes there’s things bigger than us.

The combination of the hormones, the stress of being a new mum and then not sleeping just proved to be a toxic combination for me.

[If] you find yourself facing a maternal mental health disorder it’s not your fault, you absolutely  didn’t do anything wrong, there is nothing you could have done differently to prevent it, sometimes we just react differently to the situations at hand, and surrendering to that.

Say no to things that don’t align with your values and aren’t nurturing your wellbeing, getting more protective of your time.

Getting support is not a sign of weakness, it is a sign of strength and self-assurance

It’s going to work out.

Source: Ep #19 – The Lessons from Perfectionism with Lisa Abramson – Happy Mama

Amy from Happy Mama donates 5% of subscriptions to her New Moon Mama Circles to PANDA! Here is recent Happy Mama article that resonated with me – Mother the Mother.

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

 

Hannah’s story

‘I was in my own personal, living hell. But when I came out the other side I felt so misunderstood. Now, I really want to help other mums who might be going through something similar.’

‘But I didn’t know what postpartum psychosis was or even recognise my own wife, she was that bad.’

Source: Hampshire mother sectioned with postpartum psychosis | Daily Mail Online

 Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

Nina’s Story

Having had no previous mental health issues she was diagnosed with Postpartum Psychosis 8 days after Heidi’s birth and was sectioned under the mental health act. Nina agreed to be interviewed for this blog to tell her story of Postpartum Psychosis illness and recovery, and to raise awareness.

I was tired and in pain. I was feeling overwhelmed, vulnerable and wrecked. I was looking at the other new Mums they looked so happy, they had their little angels whereas I felt on edge, permanently. I was so upset but nobody asked me how I was feeling or coping.

The postnatal Midwife was less able to detect how ill I was because she didn’t know me.

I listened to music and made myself go out of the house. My memory was still poor though, I couldn’t remember what I had done the previous day so I started to take photographs.

If my mental health had been discussed more in general and if I had been told of the warning signs of postpartum psychosis in the antenatal or early postnatal period we may have been able to notice the signs earlier.

Source: Postpartum Psychosis -Nina’s Story – Birthing Mamas Blog

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

Amanda’s Story

For my fourth episode I sat down with my friend Amanda Taylor to discuss her journey through postpartum psychosis, depression and anxiety. Amanda shares her vulnerable story with such bravery and authenticity. Her goal in sharing her story is to bring awareness to postpartum illnesses and help other moms know that they aren’t alone if they are dealing with any of these illnesses. We also talk about how you can help someone you know who might be experiencing a postpartum illness. I hope you have a better understanding of these illnesses after this episode.

Pregnant with my fourth baby…felt like another routine pregnancy, my health was great, everything was good, there no reason for anything to go off track

All seemed normal, things just got progressively with worse just mentally with me. From my perspective everything was great, I thought life as so great, I was overly joyful, everything was amazing. My husband took me to the emergency room 12 days after birth because he knew things were just not right… I left with the diagnosis of postpartum psychosis.

Dealing with all of the postpartum, I was 100% not myself

Remember thinking everything made perfect sense. It’s a bizarre state of mind, it’s not healthy, rational or real.

It was the most painful moment as the police officer escorted me and then my husband walked the opposite direction to go home and I was all by myself.

I think of hard it was but how much good was in that

I was at the lowest point in my life when I could do nothing…we can’t do any of our struggles, it may not be postpartum psychosis but whatever the struggle is, we can’t do it alone and we got to have people around us, fighting with us and for us and alongside us

Coming up on the one year anniversary and I still didn’t feel like Amanda at all, I didn’t know who I was, I didn’t feel normal…I needed more help in where I was at the time

There’s a lot of times our counsellor said this is the perfect grounds for divorce, it’s too hard for anyone to walk through so its easy to say I’m done… and my husband never took that approach, what an opportunity I get to fight for my wife and kids

Source: A Mom’s Story : Postpartum Psychosis Amanda Taylor’s Story [Ep 004]

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

Your Loved One’s Life May Depend on You Watching This Film

When the Bough Breaks, a documentary film on postpartum depression tells some stories we ALL need to hear—and share.

When The Bough Breaks is available to stream NOW on Netflix as well as Itunes!

The reason I think we ALL need to sit down and watch this documentary is that we ALL need to be aware of the RISK factors for postpartum depression and psychosis, so that we can look for these in ourselves as we continue to grow our families, and in any loved ones who are new moms.

Ensure you watch this documentary when you are feeling mentally strong and better to watch with someone by your side.

Source: Your Loved One’s Life May Depend on You Watching This Film On Postpartum Depression

 Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

You might have heard of postpartum depression

You might have heard of postpartum depression, but what about postpartum psychosis?

It’s a condition that affects 1 in 500 new mothers within the first two weeks of delivery, and symptoms include paranoia, hallucinations and delusions.

23 April at 13:14

You might have heard of postpartum depression, but what about postpartum psychosis?It's a condition that affects 1 in 500 new mothers within the first two weeks of delivery, and symptoms include paranoia, hallucinations and delusions.

Posted by ABC News on Saturday, 22 April 2017

 

Great to see ABC News raising awareness of postpartum psychosis in the Australia community! This short clip has been viewed over 45K, which is incredible!

 

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

 

Full recovery is possible

My story of postpartum psychosis has been published in The Guardian today alongside some great new research! I am so proud of the mother I have become and proud to be a PANDA Community Champion raising awareness of postpartum psychosis in our community.

“People can mistakenly describe what women like me go through as ‘baby blues’ or ‘depression’, but I was definitely not depressed,” West says.

West received treatment after a friend told her she was not behaving like her usual self and called the National Perinatal Anxiety and Depression Helpline [Panda]. They advised that West should be taken to hospital immediately for psychiatric care, and West is now a strong advocate for the helpline.

“I have to speak up because I don’t like the thought of other families going through what we did. This has to change and to do that we need better recognition of the condition.”

Source: Postpartum psychosis: research reveals full recovery possible within weeks | Life and style | The Guardian

 

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

Mum ‘intentionally’ drowns baby

The mother of a baby girl who drowned in a bathtub has pleaded not guilty to murder, on the grounds she was suffering a mental illness at the time, but guilty to manslaughter.

Source: Mother of baby girl who drowned in bathtub pleads guilty to manslaughter

Additional source:  Mum ‘intentionally’ drowns baby over mistaken fears she had dwarfism

Another mother who did not receive the support she needed, though the article does not specifically refer to the mental illness as postpartum psychosis. It highlights the importance of having support around you as a new mum, with no mention of a husband or family only friends who were ‘fed up’ with her obsessions.

Soon after the girl was born in April 2010, the mother had begun worrying obsessively that her daughter had genetic abnormalities.

This mum was in North Strathfield, only about 10 minutes away from NSW’s only Mother Baby Unit, though it’s private. It highlights the lack of support in the NSW health system yet in the same week Queensland Health announce the first public Mother Baby Unit and the week before Bendigo, Victoria announced its new public Mother Baby Unit. How many other mothers have to reach this stage and how many more deaths have to occur before the NSW government recognises perinatal mental health and the importance of early intervention. #ActNowNSWPublicMBU

“This is an important step forward because we know that intervention during the perinatal period is critical to improving the health of mothers and their ability to care for their baby.

– Queensland Health

Every year, PANDA helps thousands of Australian families affected by perinatal anxiety and depression. We believe it’s a journey no one should go through alone. Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

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