1 in 5 risk of postpartum psychosis and half are considering pregnancy plans. Research is revealing the large variety of factors influencing decision making for women with bipolar disorder including social support, family history, stigma and fear.

Understanding the importance of stigma, contextual factors such as time pressures and social support from their partner and family, local service provision, fear including the fear of becoming ill and fear of social services, and the centrality of motherhood.

This study also enabled the inclusion of views of women who decided against having a child because of bipolar disorder (26%).

This highlights the problems of getting reliable information and advice to women with bipolar disorder and what women want from services as well as the need for more training for health professionals.

Read the full study here http://bjpo.rcpsych.org/content/2/5/294 (open access).

Factors influencing women with bipolar disorder when making decisions about pregnancy and childbirth: a qualitative study – Clare Dolman, International Marcè Society Conference 2016.