The other day I was out shopping and overheard a mother say to her young son of similar age to mine “Let’s go get some beautiful bread”. The mother and son then walked into Subway. I cringed at their choice of ‘beautiful bread’.

One the first changes we made as a family was our bread. I started to look into other bread options as a way to be eco-friendly. I had started to explore the local farmers markets and other local retailers as a way to break up with the supermarkets. I was also looking into ways to reduce the amount of plastic our family consumes and had the bread bag in my sights. To me it was better to reduce rather than recycle bread bags.

I started off buying bread from local bakeries rather than the supermarket as these local loves would be fresher having not contained the preservatives to be able to be transported from factory to store and to be able to sit on the shelf longer. When we could we would indulge in artisan spelt bread from the local farmers markets. There was such a difference in taste with the fresh local bread as well as my tummy felt not as bloated. Cutting down on the additives and preservatives had to be a good thing.

After researching options into how I could make home-made bread and looking at various bread making machines we decided a Kitchen Aid would be a worthy investment on our real food journey. Having never made bread in my life and armed with a dough hook I set about baking my first loaf. The first few months we used a store bought packet of bread flour. It was great as the quantities were already measured out and the instructions on the box were easy to follow. Once I got my confidence up we progressed to a bulk bag of the same bread flour and I was able to adapt the quantities of flour to the size of the loaf I wished to bake. We found smaller loaves were easier to bake and less wastage as bread only stays fresh a couple of days.

DSC_0802 bread packet

Fresh home made bread

I discovered this little image that really resonated with me 10 signs You’re Gluten Intolerant. Bloating – Yes; Keratosis Pilaris – Yes; Feeling tired after gluten meal – Yes; Hormone imbalances – Yes; Migraines – Yes; Inflammation – Yes; Mood issues – Yes = 8/10. I never had considered that my fatty acid deficiency be secondary to a gluten intolerance. As I learned more and more about real food and how the food industry has manipulated our food, I started looking alternatives to the refined wheat flour. I got my hands on books like Grain Brain by Dr Perlmutter and Wheat Belly by Dr Davis; they were a game changer for me.

Gluten intolerance - JERF

(via Just Eat Real Food Facebook)

Reading the Changing Habits, Changing Lives Book made me question how often was I really eating this refined wheat flour? It turns out that most of my diet was wheat, breakfast, lunch and dinner. So change was needed and I slowly transitioned from refined wheat to ancient grains like spelt and Einkorn, I choose foods that didn’t contain wheat like rice pasta or gluten-free pasta, and I became conscious as to how often I was eating refined wheat.

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Changing Habits Einkorn Flour

We continue to eat bread in our household, however it is no longer two loaves or more a week from the supermarket. I will bake a small loaf of either spelt or Einkorn bread as a treat for the weekend. I didn’t think I would be able to live without bread as a staple in my diet but I don’t miss the 2 hour food cravings and upset tummy from eating refined wheat. My chicken skin is improving and I rarely have a migraine. I am grateful to enjoy the freshly baked beautiful bread made with love in my kitchen.

And there is so much more delicious food out there to eat other than refined wheat!

 

What's With Wheat Documentary - opt-in page