Sarah Short Circuit

Heal, Nourish, Nurture

Tag: Change (page 2 of 3)

Who ya gonna call?

“For women to remain empowered as they take on the joys and challenges of motherhood ideologies of mothering and femininity must be moderated. They serve to isolate and undermine women as they set unreasonable expectations of women and make fathers contribution an optional extra.”

Recovery from Postnatal Depression: Endurance, sedition and sorting the family baggage – Dr Sue Cowie, International Marcè Society Conference 2016.

Women who experience postpartum depression are greater risk to experience this again in a second pregnancy. Dr Cowie has studied how taking in the context of women’s lives and womens’ experiences and expectations and how they prepare for second birth. Four general circumstances appeared to make motherhood more difficult: traumatic or difficult birth, women’s physical health problems, child’s health and feeding problems and lack of support. Second time experience recovery themes included endurance test e.g. ‘such is life;, it just slowly got better ‘finding the baby more enjoyable’, other to mother experiences in knowing what a child needs, and seditious talk with friends to help feel normal when talking about the depression and postnatal stressors of the new baby. Having a baby the second time after experiencing postpartum depression resulted in the mother having a less idealised view of the baby, more experienced and knowledgeable, and a transformational experience .

Recovering from postpartum mood disorders? Who ya gonna call? We need to start talking more about the challenges of motherhood and talk more about the context of how things get better.

 

Digital Sabbatical

Yesterday, a Monday, I went to work to attend a work retreat day. Mondays are not my usual work day so I was out of my rhythm, particularly as I am still trying to find my groove again after being on holidays for 2 weeks. By the time I got on the train to work I reached into my bag to send hubby a text only to realise, shock horror, my phone was left at home.

However, I was not in a tizz about not having my phone connected to me for a day. I coped the whole day without worrying about if anyone had tried to call me (mum was the only missed call, nothing urgent), not having the urge to fill a spare moment by checking social media or even taking a photo to remember the moment (the view of the city from the work retreat was spectacular!). The my family coped without knowing the exact moment I was on my way home and didn’t even noticed that I had not sent a text to say I was ok.

I was not always this calm without being connected into technology. The difference was that I had just returned from my holiday which I had made into a 2 week digital sabbatical. I recently had listened to The Slow Home podcast with William Powers and not long before that had seen Brooke from Slow Your Home take a digital sabbatical in July for her family holiday. This had inspired me to disconnect and fully immerse myself to take time out for me and my family.

Do you feel the urge to constantly check your phone? Are you constantly glued to a screen? Do you feel anxious when you are not connected to technology? Just before my holiday I listened to a great conversation on One Minute Mindfulness Show about Digital Twitch. As a family we have the no technology at the dinner table with phones away and TV off, no phones to be gazed at whilst speaking with each other, no phone checking in the bedroom, and overall have slowed down our use of technology that is distracting us from living life. We are modelling to our son a better way to be mindful with technology.

We have had moments where we as parents have not been the best example, particularly when I was working heaps on the computer back in July and August on a couple of education courses. I got the reality check I needed when I was at the Twenty8 HLE graduation in Mooloolaba, watching my son wizz around Underwater World Aquarium pretending to use each of the display signs as a computer, typing away. When asked to stop and look at the fish around him my son remarked ‘I’m busy’. From this I made a conscious effort to be more mindful of how I was using technology around my son.

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Underwater World, Mooloolaba

In preparation for my digital sabbatical I turned off all Facebook notifications on my phone and removed the short cuts to social media from my home screen. I have heard some people even go the length of deleting the app entirely off their phone; I didn’t go this far. The first day of my holiday I picked up my phone out of habit, remembered my promise to myself and consequently put the phone back in my hand bag. The phone suddenly had no purpose in my present moment. I spent the next 2 weeks hardly touching my phone. There were a couple of moments when I was on the in presence of a group on my retreat where the conversation turned to everyone checking their phones. While everyone’s heads were down I was enjoying sitting on the pool deck soaking in the morning sunshine on my back.

Being on holidays and being fully disconnected was bliss. I was enjoying the company of others with much laughter and conversation with new friends at the retreat. I was taking photos for me, not with a view to share them with the world on social media. Even husband found himself checking social media hardly ever. Our second week we stayed high up in the Byron hinterland which was an enforced disconnection as there was extremely limited mobile coverage, no WI-FI and patchy TV reception. I thoroughly enjoyed the simple pleasures of spending time with my family, reading a book and many a time gazing out over the valley enjoying the ever changing vista that surrounded us.

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Vista from Toolond Plantation

Since our holiday I have chosen not to turn the notifications back on Facebook or to return social media back to my home screen. I have dramatically reduced my FOMO (fear of missing out) on social media. I have added a message on my lock screen “Be mindful”, which catches me when I find myself picking up my phone in a spare moment.

Have you thought about how connected you are to technology? Would you give a digital sabbatical a go?

 

 

Morning Ritual

My daily morning ritual is to wake up, open the blinds to let in the sunshine and open windows to let in fresh air. Turn off the bedroom diffuser from the night before as I use my diffuser on intermittent all through the night, generally with Instant Calm. I make the beds and spritz it with a few bursts of lavender to make the bed feel fresh (credit to Happy Mama with Amy for this wonderful idea).

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My bedroom diffuser

I walk into the living area and the first thing I always do is turn on my salt lamp diffuser and add my essential oil of the day for the home, generally Celebrate and Uplift. I prepare for the morning, fix breakfast, and tackle one big chore like hanging out the washing, washing up or a quick tidy up of a room putting things back to their homes.

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Energy in a bottle!

I have my shower followed by my body boost choosing a blend like Energy & Vitality if it is one of the days I work or go to the gym or Focus and Clarity on the days I go to work.

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Focus for the work day ahead

Husband can always tell if I having a flat day if the blinds are still closed and I am still in my PJs when he gets home from work. The simple act of opening the blinds, making the bed and having a shower all help to invigorate me to tackle the day, and these acts are made all the more powerful with the incorporation of Twenty8 essential oils into small and simple rituals.

What rituals help you to start your day?

 

Day with Cyndi

I volunteered at Changing Habits Day with Cyndi, Sydney on May 23 2015. I assisted throughout the day answering questions, supporting people and selling Changing Habits products, as well as listening to the beautiful Cyndi share her knowledge with a crowd of 160 people. I definitely saw the impact the MINDD forum had on Cyndi as she passionately spoke about how we need to feed our families to heal the nation.

Wilful Blindness – Information that you could and should know but you somehow manage not to know.

Day with CYndi Chang Habs Blind

Culture and tradition is so important, knowing the seasons, the way we prepare our food and the type of foods. We have to honour the way we eat our foods. Our culture tells us what we should be doing. For example every culture has a ferment.

Day with CYndi Chang Habs culture

90% of you is actually your microbiome. Your microbiome is everywhere, not just in your gut. Improve your microbiome and you will start to eat better, as your microbiome send out signals to seek out these foods.

Day with CYndi Chang Habs Mircobiome

There are many problems with today’s modern wheat, so I will stick with ancient grains of wheat like Emmer Wheat or Spelt or none at all.

Day with CYndi Chang Habs Cascade Wheat

Day with CYndi Chang Habs Wheat

Autoimmunity is caused by genetics, environment and leaky gut. We need to clean up our environment and heal our gut.

Day with CYndi Chang Habs heal gut

Day with CYndi Chang Habs environment

For me attending a Day with Cyndi this year was a time of reflection of the past 14 months and how much I have changed since I attended last year’s event. I am now loving real food, making food from scratch, discovering fermented foods, released 30kgs, educating myself to heal myself, regaining my vitality and finding my tribe.

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Cyndi and I at Day with Cyndi, Sydney

I was able to share my story with people, how I changed one small thing at a time as there are no quick fixes. People were asking which product is the best for to start off with or people would reach straight for the Changing Habits Fat Elimination Protocol and I would gently guide them towards the Changing Habits, Changing Lives book as a way to start this journey. That is how I started and I am living proof that no matter how different it may appear compared to what you are currently doing and eating, that change is achievable.  It was beautiful to meet new people and have a chat with Wendy, Nat and Malcolm.

Change starts with you

(via Changing Habits Facebook)

This image resonated with me after the Day with Cyndi. It is up to us to take the first step towards change, no one else is going to do it for you. The food industry is not going to change, the farming practices are not going to change, the pharmaceutical industry is not going to change, the damage being done to the environment is not going to change, unless we first change ourselves. Change what we are eating, change our lifestyle, change our health care and be more loving towards our environment. The change starts with YOU!

 

Changing Habits Emmer Wheat Flour

Money Tree

Money doesn’t grow on trees, but in tight times I so wish it did. Times are tight financially for my family at present with last Friday being the tightest we have been with $0.05 remaining the joint account (until the following Tuesday!). The fridge was bare, we were down to our last reheat meal and we were due to visit the farmers market on Saturday to restock on fresh produce and meat. How were we going to manage to live for the next fortnight?

Not having money is a huge stress for me and having a mere 5 cents in our joint account made me pause and reflect on our situation. Finances have been exceptionally tight for the past 3 years after I was made redundant at work when I was 30 weeks pregnant. This was a huge challenge for us during the most exciting time of bringing our first child into the world and was further compounded when I developed Postpartum Psychosis. Like the average Australian we carried a credit card debt and we tended to spend more than we earned. We are living pay check to pay check, and at times I am checking the account balances daily to monitor the ever occurring whirlwinds of money comes in and money goes out.

I reassessed our financial predicament:

  • Pay yourself first

In working out a budget system that works for my family I came across Melissa at Frugal and Thriving. I love her concept of paying yourself first. Each week I allocate money aside for different expenses and whatever is left (usually not much) is what we have to spend. The beauty of paying yourself first is that you set up automatic payments so it’s money you can’t see and therefore can’t spend on everyday expenses. Each week we allocate money for things like upcoming bill expenses (transferred into a savings account), health insurance, transport and savings for my son for future expenses.

Last week I had paid our selves first, then had some unexpected but necessary expenses and therefore was left with nothing left to spend for the rest of the week.

  • Earning tips

My husband works in an industry where he earns tips. Tips have given us the space to breath during these tight times. The luxury of getting take away or a meal out. Or buying a lush bottle of wine (or two). Or simply adding some extra cash to our coin jar to stretch the budget. Recently I was reading Cait’s story at Blonde on a Budget, and I got an aha moment. You should not be reliant on tips to pay your fixed expenses. We are not reliant on these tips, particularly as we never know when and how much tips will be.  Something to work on though is to put some tips towards our debt repayments.

Last week husband was paid tips and it went towards fixed expenses rather than stretching the budget.

  • Debt Repayment

I got the shock of my life a while back when I looked at the credit card statement; if we were paying the minimum repayments each month it would take up 112 years to pay it off. While we always paid more than the minimums anyway, this hustled me in banning the use of the credit card. I worked through No Spend January and Frugal February with the help of the group from Slow your Home, even got through most of March even with large car expenses. However by April the wheels fell off with a budget blow out and the use of the credit card crept back into our lives.  Melissa at Frugal and Thriving has some great tips on debt busting and  I have used many different ways of paying off debt by choosing what works best for me. Whilst paying off debt we are also building up a small savings at the same time. I can’t get on top of the credit card debt if I continue to keep swiping it any chance I get.

I declared July a no spend credit card month.

  • Christmas crunch

Each year Christmas rolls around and the credit card gets a work out. By January we suffer with the credit card hangover. Each year we kept saying we should save up for next year’s Christmas but never do. This year I decided to do things differently. I came across this brilliant 52 week money challenge from Jan at A Gluttonous Wife and thought it was something I would challenge myself with in the lead up to this year’s Christmas.

Starting with $1 in Week 1, each week I add a dollar more than the previous week, so Week 2 is $2, Week 3 is $3 and so forth.  The first 6 months have sailed by without any challenge and have allowed me the extra cash to put towards debt repayments. Week 30 is $30 and will only continue to increase, plus I still am working on paying off debt. I am hanging in there as the $1300 incentive by Christmas will be a nice present to myself of a stress free Christmas period.

Now I am in July, 30 weeks into the challenge, I am starting to feel the burn.

  • Cash versus (debit) card

Part of paying ourselves first is allocating how much we can spend on groceries each week. I find I am better able to track expenses when we use our debit card, particularly as we have a joint account and we both do the shopping at different times during the week. The exception to using our debit card is each week I withdraw a set amount of cash to spend at the farmers markets. Having cash only to spend at the markets makes us take note of what we are spending and what our priorities are.

While there was only $0.05 in our joint account, we had $100 cash for the farmers market.

So we changed our plan of attack. Instead of going to the farmers market with a supermarket top up we opted for the local fruit store and Aldi for our entire shop. I had to slacken my priority of health buying organic, or spray free fruit and vegetables where possible for everything conventional. I chose price over packaging and selected vegetables that were pre-wrapped in the foam trays and plastic wrap or bundles together in plastic mesh bags, trying not to think about Plastic Free July. I was still supporting small local business by shopping at the local fruit store plus I was able to pick up some great bargains though in the reduced section. To stretch the grocery budget further we bought our meat from Aldi rather than the local butchers, but was still able to get grass-fed meat or free-range chicken which are on my list of priorities for health. I was proud of myself of putting food on our plate for less this fortnight. Husband and I did a huge cook up on Saturday night to start us off with a bang for our buck!

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Our cook up

Do you live week to week? Have you got debt to repay? What are some of the tricks and tips you do to manage your finances?

 

Wipe Out

At a recent birthday celebration my son managed to spread icing down his pants while eating a cup cake. Being at someone’s else home I hesitated at first on how to deal with the mess. ‘Go grab a baby wipe from inside’ someone suggested. Now that our kids are getting older and are all out of nappies I would never have thought to go get a baby wipe. I quickly went inside and grabbed a wipe. Opening the packet took my breath away with the overpowering, fake fragrance. The baby wipe was great to clean up the icing but I thought to myself how can anyone use these on their children with all those chemicals in it?

You know you're a mom when you use baby wipes

Baby wipes are an essential item for parents and tend to be used for everything, not just on babies bottoms. However, people are starting to become more aware of the hidden nasties lurking in seeming innocent products like baby wipes. The latest headline “The South Australian Government said national figures showed 15 per cent of people tested this year had reacted to the preservative Methylisothiazolinone (MI), which is used in some brands of wipes.”. I have heard numerous stories of children developing a rash around their mouth from their parents using baby wipes to wipe their faces. This preservative MI was reported last year to being linked in an increase in allergic reactions and dermatitis and was what prompted me to look at the ingredients listed on the baby wipes I was using at the time as my son had a bad case of nappy rash. Jo at Down to Earth mother has recently blogged a great post on 10 ingredients to look out for in baby wipes.

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My cloth wipes and Wot Not wipes

As I learnt more about the chemical toxins in our personal care products, as well as the issue of the fatberg in our sewers, I phased out conventional baby wipes. Being a cloth nappy family we used cloth wipes with a splash of water at home rather than baby wipes. Our family found that cloth wipes tend to get most poo-namis cleaned up using a 2-3 wipes rather 10 or more baby wipes that you feel are smearing everywhere. Husband tends to still prefer the cloth wipes even now we are in the toilet training phase as the cloth wipes are even better than toilet paper. Cloth wipes are also a more frugal alternative to conventional baby wipes. If we happened to need a baby wipe while out and about or for use at Day Care I have a packet of Wot Not baby wipes. Wot Nots contain no parabens, 100% chlorine free, no synthetic fragrances, organic as well as an Australian product.

Have you had an allergic reaction to baby wipes? Have you thought about what is in the products, like baby wipes, that you are using on your children every day?

 

DIY Lunch Bags

In a way to reduce the amount of plastic we use around the home I have been looking at ways to swap from the plastic zip lock lunch bags to a more environmentally friendly option. Our first step was to reuse the plastic bags where possible by washing them, not always a fun task. Another option was switching to the humble brown paper bag, however this was still a disposable alternative. I was wanting a reuseable product that was easy to use. I had my eye on the Biome sandwich wraps and have popped a few on my wish list.

I then stumbled across Frugal and Thriving’s two posts (here and here) on free bag making tutorials. I spotted the Sandwich bag tutorial and thought to myself I can do that. Mum had some fabric I could use including some rubber backed upholstery fabric swatches. Over the next two hours I whipped up a very impressive DIY lunch bag.

You will need cotton fabric for the outer material, nylon fabric for the lining, and a sewing machine plus sewing accessories.

1. Cut a rectangle from both the cotton and the nylon fabric.

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Step 1

2. Fold cotton fabric right sides together. On one side mark from the top approx. of third of the way down. Sew from this mark down towards the middle fold. Repeat for the other side. Repeat process on nylon fabric.

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Step 2

3. Create a box corners on both the cotton and nylon fabric by folding each corner into a 90 degree triangle and sewing across the tip. Cut off the excess leaving a seam allowance.

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Step 3

4. Turn the nylon bag now right side out and insert into the cotton bag so that right sides are together.

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Step 4

5. Sew around one one flap starting from divide around to the other divide, leaving an opening in one spot.

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Step 5

6. Turn the bags right side out ensuring the nylon fabric is turned to the inside as the lining.

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Step 6

7. Top stitch around both flaps.

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Step 7

8. Fold one flap down and sew this down through the side seams, reinforcing at the join points (areas of stress).

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Step 8

9. To close the bag, flip the folded flap over the upper flap

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Finished product!

I did not follow the dimensions in the tutorial as my size was dictated by the size of the pre-cut swatches I had for the inner lining. Note to self: rubber backed fabric is difficult to work with, especially if you are new to using a sewing machine. Husband was so keen to use them after they were made I had not even had a chance to pre-wash them (don’t worry I didn’t let him use it till it was washed). Please remember these bags are not watertight or waterproof.

Now all I have to do is make a few more lunch bags and perhaps play around with the dimensions to create different sizes. I still have some rubber backed swatches so I may go looking for the Green Lifestyle Magazine I have somewhere with the bowl covers tutorial. Keep you posted if I find it!

 

Time to get a journal

We have all had a moment in time, usually in childhood, where we write our deepest, darkest secrets in a diary. For most of us though the act of writing our inner thoughts in a diary wanes after a while. For others it morphs into list making as a way to keep life organised. I have always been one for lists, written on odd bits of paper, post it notes both hard copy and virtual, and running to do list in my head. This system of lists had worked until a big gust of wind came along and scattered lists everywhere.

Those winds were Postpartum Psychosis. As I descended into psychosis my list making increased, writing endless notes on bits of paper to remember what I needed to do, when to feed the baby, what questions to ask people about things I wasn’t sure of, list after list. I remember getting an exercise book out one morning as a journal and pouring out the contents of my head to try to get my thoughts to stop racing. I even attempted to get a diary working for me to work out upcoming appointments for our son and me as I was having trouble keeping track of days and time.

As I recovered, with my memory shot to pieces, I struggled to keep track of what things needed doing. If it wasn’t written down, it didn’t get done. I started off using our kitchen whiteboard to jot down what chores needed doing, upcoming appointments, and general tid bits. I progressed to Evernote app and Google calendar, both of which were very handy as I can sync with my husband. The downfall of technology however was it was out of sight, out of mind and not a reliable method of recording quick thoughts as notes.

This all changed August last year when I came across bullet journalling. Back to the old school pen and paper method the original bullet journal concept makes it so easy to be organised. Just jot down tasks on a day to day list, any tasks not done in the month get rolled onto the month to do list, as well a monthly view calendar. Any special topics e.g. Christmas lists, holiday checklists can be created as a separate page and indexed. Everything is in the one place with symbols distinguishing between tasks, events, notes. There is not any particular type of diary you have to buy for it to work, any blank note book will do. The lists can be as big or as small as you like, with no pressure to write in a pre-defined area, and its ok if you skip a day (or two!) So simple!

Here is a video by the creator of Bullet Journal to give you an overview:

Since I started bullet journalling my productivity has sky rocketed. I feel a sense of accomplishment as I tick off things on my to do list. I am motivated to complete tasks that have been hanging around on my monthly lists for too long. I don’t forget the little things to do as I now write them down on the day I think of them; it doesn’t mean I have to get it done that day. I even started a bullet journal at work to help keep organised and on track with all the tasks I am working on. I would be so lost without bullet journalling.

I still use the kitchen whiteboard as a place for meal plan ideas, chore prompting, and the occasional upcoming event. All events are synced into our Google calendars, so my husband and I both know what is coming up for our family. I use Evernote a lot for occasional notes like books to read, photos of receipts, wish list items and other random notes. My go-to master list is now my Gratitude Diary 2015 (from Biome) with the bullet journalling to do lists and notes, as well as my daily gratitudes, all in one convenient location. If I feel like I am getting overwhelmed or lost my rhythm I call a 5 five minute time out where I can brain dump everything into my diary.

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My gratitude diary (from Biome)

I start the Twenty8 Health and Lifestyle Educator Program next Monday and I am so excited to be learning everything there is know about essential oils and self-care from the passionate Kim Morrison. I received the first email this week in preparation for the start of the course and it was titled “Time to get a Journal”. At first I was hesitant to be writing my flowing thoughts into a journal. I now see this as an opportunity to expand my daily journalling practice, and as a way to document my feelings, thoughts and learnings on the Twenty8 HLE course as an investment in myself.

Are you a list maker? Do you write your musings in a journal? Or are your a bullet journal fan?

Race

Ready, set, race!

I’m distracted, left behind in my own world as my legs start to turn over.

Pick up the pace, turn up a gear!

Focus, who am I kidding, my head is not in the room, its off planning what I will do after class, thinking what my son is up to… my thoughts are racing.

“You make me feel good,
You make me feel safe,
You know I wouldn’t have it any other way”

As I am thinking of husband working 6 days a week and missing him heaps the beat of Laserlight by Jessie J brings me back into the moment. I am alive, my legs are spinning, beads of perspiration are trickling down my face. Reality check. This is my time, my moment.

I’ve got that feeling returning, I remember this feeling. I start to feel good as Flo Rida Good Feeling pumps away my thoughts.

Start to climb!

I start to drift off, reminiscing about times in high school as Bomfunk MC Freestyler and Fragma Toca’s Miracle pound out of the speakers, my thoughts seem a million miles away but my legs keep spinning to the bass.

Increase the resistance!

Bring it back, focus, feel the burn. Forget about the thoughts as my body works hard. Get lost in the music not my thoughts. Slow down the race in my head, there is no winner.

Race!

No one gets left behind in the spin room, there are no losers, we are all in it together.

As the instructor wearing a Spider Man suit brings the class to a close I reflect on my spin class today. My head wasn’t in a good space, I need to slow down again. I have lost my rhythm, my routine at the gym and I miss the good feeling.

The gym is my outlet for release and time out. While I am  not a gym junkie, it is a place where I can forget about the world and focus on myself. Feel my body working hard, building strength and letting go of the stress. A place where I can stop my thoughts racing away. Even while I was pregnant we planned enough money in our budget for me to continue with the gym despite people saying we should give up our gym membership with a new bub and a single income. Going to the gym is my time for self-care.

The gym has been a wonderful place for me especially on my journey of healing and recovery. I get to know familiar faces, friendly smiles are exchanged and conversations are struck up with the regulars. On days I am feeling flat and I drag myself to the gym, I get a buzz once I am there and interacting with other people and working my body. The regulars greet me with a smile and a laugh along with words of encouragement as they notice the changes in me, the weight I have lost. Even a personal trainer that I saw 18 months ago at my heaviest did a double take at me recently and came up to me with words of amazement and encouragement.

Though my routine has been shaky of late and my head feels like it’s picking up speed, I know that the gym is where I am grounded, I get that good feeling!

Beautiful Bread

The other day I was out shopping and overheard a mother say to her young son of similar age to mine “Let’s go get some beautiful bread”. The mother and son then walked into Subway. I cringed at their choice of ‘beautiful bread’.

One the first changes we made as a family was our bread. I started to look into other bread options as a way to be eco-friendly. I had started to explore the local farmers markets and other local retailers as a way to break up with the supermarkets. I was also looking into ways to reduce the amount of plastic our family consumes and had the bread bag in my sights. To me it was better to reduce rather than recycle bread bags.

I started off buying bread from local bakeries rather than the supermarket as these local loves would be fresher having not contained the preservatives to be able to be transported from factory to store and to be able to sit on the shelf longer. When we could we would indulge in artisan spelt bread from the local farmers markets. There was such a difference in taste with the fresh local bread as well as my tummy felt not as bloated. Cutting down on the additives and preservatives had to be a good thing.

After researching options into how I could make home-made bread and looking at various bread making machines we decided a Kitchen Aid would be a worthy investment on our real food journey. Having never made bread in my life and armed with a dough hook I set about baking my first loaf. The first few months we used a store bought packet of bread flour. It was great as the quantities were already measured out and the instructions on the box were easy to follow. Once I got my confidence up we progressed to a bulk bag of the same bread flour and I was able to adapt the quantities of flour to the size of the loaf I wished to bake. We found smaller loaves were easier to bake and less wastage as bread only stays fresh a couple of days.

DSC_0802 bread packet

Fresh home made bread

I discovered this little image that really resonated with me 10 signs You’re Gluten Intolerant. Bloating – Yes; Keratosis Pilaris – Yes; Feeling tired after gluten meal – Yes; Hormone imbalances – Yes; Migraines – Yes; Inflammation – Yes; Mood issues – Yes = 8/10. I never had considered that my fatty acid deficiency be secondary to a gluten intolerance. As I learned more and more about real food and how the food industry has manipulated our food, I started looking alternatives to the refined wheat flour. I got my hands on books like Grain Brain by Dr Perlmutter and Wheat Belly by Dr Davis; they were a game changer for me.

Gluten intolerance - JERF

(via Just Eat Real Food Facebook)

Reading the Changing Habits, Changing Lives Book made me question how often was I really eating this refined wheat flour? It turns out that most of my diet was wheat, breakfast, lunch and dinner. So change was needed and I slowly transitioned from refined wheat to ancient grains like spelt and Einkorn, I choose foods that didn’t contain wheat like rice pasta or gluten-free pasta, and I became conscious as to how often I was eating refined wheat.

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Changing Habits Einkorn Flour

We continue to eat bread in our household, however it is no longer two loaves or more a week from the supermarket. I will bake a small loaf of either spelt or Einkorn bread as a treat for the weekend. I didn’t think I would be able to live without bread as a staple in my diet but I don’t miss the 2 hour food cravings and upset tummy from eating refined wheat. My chicken skin is improving and I rarely have a migraine. I am grateful to enjoy the freshly baked beautiful bread made with love in my kitchen.

And there is so much more delicious food out there to eat other than refined wheat!

 

What's With Wheat Documentary - opt-in page

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