Sarah Short Circuit

Heal, Nourish, Nurture

Tag: Health (page 1 of 4)

Kultures

Making homemade coconut yoghurt is as simple as add the coconut cream, add the Kultured Wellness cultures, blend to combine and pop into a jar or 2, leaving it on the bench for 8 to 12 hours. Trickiest step was opening the cans!

KW coconut yoghurt culture set up

KW coconut yoghurt culture set up

It’s alive! It may look like it has split but my batch of Kultured Wellness coconut yoghurt has expanded with all the good bacteria in it. Simply stir with a wooden spoon and enjoy!

KW coconut yoghurt

KW coconut yoghurt

Best coconut cream to use for Kultured Wellness coconut yoghurt is Ayam, however the 400ml cans can be tricky to find. Best tip I got was to look in your local Asian grocery shop! Supporting local business and only 40c more than the smaller cans in the big supermarkets.

Recommended coconut cream to use

Recommended coconut cream to use

Simple yet highly potent, these cultures are very beneficial in rebuilding after the damage in our guts from our modern lifestyle. I am certainly feeling the potency with some die off symptoms from using the coconut kefir lately.

KW coconut kefir culture set up

Sale time with an EXCITING GIFT for you all! Beautiful Kirsty is excited to GIFT those of you who purchase the 3 for 2 culture sale, her workshop video as she knows there are many of you who are unable to reach her workshops or wish you could refer back to what Kirsty speaks about at these events. In this workshop Kirsty talks all things Gut Health, microbiome, fermented foods, pregnancy and also the story of how she got to where she is today along side her beautiful little family!! The workshop is valued at $49 so don’t miss out on this limited special bonus!! (Offer end July 6 2017). Tip: Share the cultures with a friend or keep them all for you and freeze the cultures till you need them!

If you would like some hand on guidance with getting to know your kultures, get in touch with me, your local Health and Lifestyle Mentor!

Further information

A Quirky Journey 62: Kultured Wellness Kirsty Wirth

Up for a Chat 154: Eradicating Parasites with Kirsty Wirth

Low Tox Life #42: The Many Personalities of Bacteria with Kirsty Wirth

 

Kultured Wellness

ACNEM 2017

Totally in my element over the weekend with all things Brain Health for Better Life Outcomes at the 7th Science of Nutrition in Medicine (ACNEM) Conference 2017 (except for the chilly Melbourne weather).

What is more important than a well functioning nervous system?

Prof Felice Jacka, Nutrition and brain health over the life course, discussed 10% of Australia adults and less than 50% of children eat according to dietary guidelines with a dose response to vegetable intake and health outcomes. Information of on what to eat has been muddied by industry with the productions of processed foods pushed out as healthy foods. Mental and substance disorders are the leading source of disability, there is a growing burden of dementia and cognitive disease, and an increase in prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders all linked to diet and lifestyle. Diet quality is linked to common mental health disorders, particularly depression, with either not enough good or too much bad, both are independent factors that increase a person’s risk independent of their socioeconomic status, education, health behaviours, weight and irrespective of the form the diet takes. Genetics and early life trauma are less modifiable than diet and pregnancy is linked to the childrens later mental health. The biological pathways of how diet influences mental health include inflammation and oxidative stress, cytokines, low grade activation of the immune system, brain plasticity and gut microbiome. 70% of our immune function is our gut, with the importance of fermenting foods and fibre. Biological dysregulation (see slide).

Prof Felice Jacka ACNEM 2017

A leaky gut is many things degrading the gut lining resulting in the transportation of these factors into the blood stream and mounting an immune response. Experimental evidence suggests exaggerated stress, blunted immune system and increase blood brain barrier permeability is similar to autism and that microbiota is essential for brain development. The sources of bacteria are transient and can help out e.g. probiotics can alter anxiety like behaviours. After 4 generations cannot resuce our microbiota except by facel transplant. We can improve our diet and our mental health. Find out more at the Food Mood Centre.

Prof Felice Jacka ACNEM 2017

Prof Michael Berk, The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in mental health and nutrient treatment options, was a fascinating talk on mitochondria in a range of disorders and is an essential feature of bipolar and resting energy phase dysregulation. Many factors including diet and inflammatory markers impact on mitochondria. In mitochondria the failure to up-regulate in the presence of demand and down-regulate when the demand goes. Treatment of hyperthermia increase mitochondria and reduces depression under red lights/sauna. The use of nutraceuticals as treatments are not benign, can worsen some disorders, everyone responds differently to the same foods (recommend viewing Eran Segal).

Prof Michael Berk ACNEM 2017

Dr Felice Gersh, Estrogen and Brain Health: Exploring estrogen’s vital role linking the brain, the gut microbiome, and the immune system, made me realise just how important our hormones are to our overall health. Dr Gersh explored the vital role estrogen plays in linking our brain, gut, microbiome and immune system. Females have three times the prevalence of dementia, rapid cognitive decline, more depression, bipolar, more brain issues due to estrogen. Menopause is the end of metabolic homoeostasis. Estrogen is neuroprotective, and has played an evolutionary role in survival, telling the body you are healthy and able to reproduce. Estrogen receptors affect many organs in the body and regulate mitochondrial production. In Pubmed estrogen replacement therapy is listed as an endrocrine disruptor! Estrogen promotes neural plasticity, cognitive function and is a glucose transporter for the brain. Estrogen controls our circadian rythym, it sets the beat, and controls out autonomic nervous system. Our microbiome is diurnal also influences our circadian rythym and disease susceptibility. Circadian dysfunction can cause leaky gut and our immune system is highly regulate by our circadian rhythm.

Dr Felice Gersh ACNEM 2017

Dr Denise Furness, Nutritional genomics and mood disorders, discussed how our genes give us a risk or predisposition not a diagnosis. We are so pro-inflammatory due to stress upregulation which from our evolutionary advatage was great for infections and wounds compared to now we have different types of stress (recommended viewing Julia Rucklidge).

Dr Denise Furness ACNEM 2017

Dr Felice Jacka, Dietary intervention for adults with major depression (The SMILES Trial), asked the question “If I improve my diet, will my mental health improve?” by carrying out a 12 week RCT with people with a poor diet quality, stable, not psychotic/bipolar, tended to be treatment resistant and not vegan/vegetarian. Patients had 7 sessions starting weekly then fortnightly with a modified Mediterranean diet. The study focused on sustainable changes and has various measures of dietary adherence. Patients received a food hamper to try new foods (see slide). It was challenge to recruit to the study, there were many limitations and in hindsight it would have been great to collect samples to test the microbiome. Results showed that those in the dietary intervention had greater reduction in depressive symptoms and one third were in remission. Read more on the SMILES Trial.

Prof Felice Jacka ACNEM 2017

Dr Natalie Parletta, Evidence and practical applications for improving diet in patients with mental disorders and impact of diet on mental health from the HELFIMED study, talked how people do not make the connection between diet and our health. Over 35% of our food are from discretionary foods. The HELFIMED was a 6 month RCT on dietary behaviour change and the Mediterranean diet, including teaching people cooking skills and encouraging to eat more whole foods with food hampers, healthy menu plans and cooking support. Results see slide.

Dr Natalie Parletta ACNEM 2017

A/Prof Ross Grant, Brain Inflammation – an ageing time bomb, discussed the brain inflammation with leaky gut stimulating inflammation in the body as well as the brain and cytokines may be stimulating our vagus nerve. The hippocampus is vulnerable to inflammation and is one of only 2 areas in the brain where neurogenesis is possible.

Dr Dave Jenkins, The Professor Dale Bredesen protocol for reversing early Alzheimer’s disease, was something new to me, how we optimise not just normalise metabolic perturbations, with a lot of behaviour change required, this protocol goes against the silver bullet mindset with a team approach and 50% diet. This integrative approach is based on diet, exercise, sleep, stress and core treatments turmeric, DHA and magnesium with the objective to remove factors that cause or exacerbate damage to the central nervous system and provide with elements to protect, repair and perform to stimulate the central nervous system. Read more on the protocol here.

Dr Dave Jenkins ACNEM 2017

Dr John Hart, Cognitive decline case study, was inspiring to see such a comprehensive treatment plans including light and circadian rhythm management

Dr John Hart ACNEM 2017

This ACNEM weekend continue to support just how important our nutrition is for our mental health. Looking for a simple holistic approach to health and nutrition and want to learn more? Study new online ‘Introduction to Nutrition’ Course at your own pace – 10 modules. Learn and implement new skills, allowing you to make sustainable changes in your health and diet.

 

Introduction to Nutrition Course

Full recovery is possible

My story of postpartum psychosis has been published in The Guardian today alongside some great new research! I am so proud of the mother I have become and proud to be a PANDA Community Champion raising awareness of postpartum psychosis in our community.

“People can mistakenly describe what women like me go through as ‘baby blues’ or ‘depression’, but I was definitely not depressed,” West says.

West received treatment after a friend told her she was not behaving like her usual self and called the National Perinatal Anxiety and Depression Helpline [Panda]. They advised that West should be taken to hospital immediately for psychiatric care, and West is now a strong advocate for the helpline.

“I have to speak up because I don’t like the thought of other families going through what we did. This has to change and to do that we need better recognition of the condition.”

Source: Postpartum psychosis: research reveals full recovery possible within weeks | Life and style | The Guardian

 

Know the signs and seek help early. PANDA National Helpline 1300 729 360 panda.org.au

Shaky start

Becoming a mum was shaky start for me, not at all how I had imagined it to be. I had prepared myself in the months and weeks leading up to my due date. I read books, attended antenatal classes, participated in an Australian Breastfeeding Australia workshop, everything and anything to get ready to bring my baby into the world. However on my due date is when things started to unravel for me.

The night of my due date my waters broke and I thought to myself that everything is happening just as it should. The next day I went up to the hospital to get checked out and I was in the early stages of labour so sent home to progress the labour. This cycle continued for the next four days however my labour was not progressing. To be safe my doctor kept me in hospital, I was becoming tired and my baby was starting to show signs of distress. Within the space of 10 minutes I was prepped and being wheeled down the corridor to the operating theatre. My son was brought into this world in the nick of time with a cesarean section.

After the operation, I waited in the recovery ward for my son to be brought into me. And I waited, watching the time tick by, minute by minute waiting. Waiting for someone, anyone to come and tell me what was going on. I could hear commotion beside me with nurses rushing in and out, talking in hushed tones. Not quiet enough to be overhead by me as I understood the whispers of medical lingo to know that the patient beside me had passed away.

Paralysed, both physically from the analgesia and emotionally from being separated my baby, I laid there waiting. In a hospital that allows mothers to connect with their newborn during recovery after surgery, I did not get this precious time with my new baby. It was a long 45 minutes later my midwife came to take me back to the maternity ward where my son had been sharing his first skin to skin cuddles with his father.

On the ward I soaked up the snuggles and inhaled the scent of my baby boy with the biggest, exhausted smile on my face. I was elated to be with my family however no one spoke of what had happened on the recovery ward. Our parents came in to visit their new grandson and my dad noticed that I had the shakes. Little body tremors like my body had gone into shock. These shakes would come and go during the first few days after the birth. I felt quite lightheaded which I put down to having just gone through an operation. I remember sitting up nursing my son when this wave of nausea came crashing over me as I quickly asked my husband to take our baby before I vomited everywhere. The nurses came to our aid and helped me back to bed where they tilted the bed back to get some blood flow back to my head. And I slept, more sleep than I had had in the past 4 days, I rested till my baby needed his next feed.

Breast feeding with a cold cloth on my head

As new parents we muddled our way through the first few days, a blur of feed, sleep, change nappy, repeat. I strongly wanted to breastfeed my son, doing everything by the books and what I had been taught. My body didn’t get the same memo. Each time my son would latch on and start to feed I would get this feeling of starting to warm up to the point of being unbearable, my feet would start to swell and I would start to tremor. I would sit there and clutch my baby as I watched my feet swell up. It was like I was trapped in my body not able to say much as I either got the shakes or passed out. There was a number of times where we would either call my dad or our friends down the street to come and hold the baby whilst my husband supported me to land back on earth. I continued to experience these episodes of tremors and passing out till one episode I felt my chest was going to explode and the ambulance was called.

My feet swelling up

Hours later spent in the emergency department, with tests and a chest x-ray, it was a week to the day since giving birth to my baby. I was in a lot of stress during breast feeding and I had been calling the midwives regularly as I was emotionally upset that my baby was not breast feeding. I was very distressed about the health of my baby as I thought he had not been putting on weight. I had not had decent sleep in days and I had difficulty concentrating. The doctors described my episode as ‘went blank and then floppy followed by nodding of head, trembling of hands and feet’.

Diagnosis: Vasovagal Syncope

On my discharge papers an Acute Community Treatment Team (ACTT) referral was made re postpartum depression/blues with the ACTT social worker stating ‘Not an ACTT issue’.  Over the following days this all changed as I unravelled further…

What is vasovagal syncope? I will let you know in the next blog post!

Global Stress Summit

Postpartum and the Thyroid

Listening to Dr Kelly Brogan on the Thyroid Sessions back in 2014 was the first realisation that my thyroid may be a piece of my postpartum psychosis puzzle. Dr Kelly discussed the triangle of psychiatric symptoms, gluten intolerance and thyroid dysfunction and this was the first time I heard a medical doctor discuss postpartum psychosis directly. Women with first episode postpartum psychosis were 19% positive for thyroid antibodies and within 9 months 67% had a higher risk to develop autoimmune hypothyroidism (1). Dr Kelly discussed how postpartum thyroid symptoms can be easily attributed to being a new mum, such as lead limbs, feeling fatigued, super forgetful, mentally disorganised which at 9 months postpartum could be symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease or postpartum thyroiditis. Postpartum issues lead straight to psychiatry, no acknowledgement of the female hormones, not even a test for thyroid function. Dr Kelly says that psychiatric symptoms are usually endocrine related: thyroid or adrenal or blood sugar regulation with insulin or leptin or your sex hormones progesterone or oestrogen. Also, zinc, selenium, magnesium and iodine are key nutrients in thyroid function. To find out more about these psychiatric pretenders I recommend reading A Mind of Your Own.

Typically when you go to your General Practitioner, the thyroid test is limited to blood test TSH, which is a pituitary hormone measure, an indirect measure of thyroid function. To get the full picture of your thyroid free thyroid levels T3 and T4, reverse T3 and thyroid autoantibodies. My GP was reluctant to do further tests as my TSH came back ‘normal’ until I showed him a copy of the research paper (1). Remember there is not one size fits all, you may have symptoms even being in the ‘normal’ range.

The Thyroid Secret is on now and I am looking forward to tuning in to Episode 7: Motherhood Interrupted to discover more about the role of thyroid in the postpartum period (starts on Wednesday 8 March 10am Sydney time).

PS: My test results including my thyroid antibodies came back all good and my GP has noted on my file to check and monitor my thyroid function  if and when I fall pregnant.

References

1. Prevalence of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction in postpartum psychosis. The British Journal of Psychiatry Mar 2011, 198 (4) 264-268

Further Reading

 

Sunflower juice

Look mummy, sunflower juice! Ahh, not quite Master 4.

When we as a family first started to transition to a healthier way of life and as I became more aware of ingredients I made sure the foods we were eating did not contain vegetable or canola oil. Just think, how do you get oil from a vegetable? Same goes for rice bran oil!

Vegetable oils, including canola and sunflower oil, are highly processed, toxic & inflammatory to our body, and are found in almost every processed, packaged food.

I use good fats like coconut oil, olive oil, butter, ghee and lard. For products containing vegetable oil I either found alternative products or now make them myself.

Wondering what ingredients may be lurking in your kitchen pantry or bathroom cabinet? As a Health and Lifestyle Mentor I can assist you to reset your kitchen and bathroom starting with checking the ingredients. I also share with you some of the food and skincare with no nasty ingredients that you will find in my kitchen and bathroom on my Shopping List.

Further Information

Click

I am about to listen to another speaker at the MINDD Forum 2015. A gentleman stands up and starts clicking his pen as he speaks. He continues to click and click and CLICK! I become irritated with all that clicking not being able to fully focus on what he is saying. Why won’t he just stop that infuriating click?

Dr Frank Golick pauses and asks “Who in the room is finding this clicking noise annoying?” Now you have my attention. Dr Golik proceeds with his talk on ‘Pyrroles: Mental Health impacts’ and as I sit there having never heard of pyrolles before it clicks. It is like Dr Golik is describing me and my health issues right back to high school.

Symptoms that I could relate to include:

  • stress intolerance
  • high irritability and mood swings
  • morning nausea which is aggravated by smells and taste (since high school for me)
  • tendency to skip or delay breakfast (I have always tended to do this)
  • difficultly taking supplements in the morning (always make me gag)
  • dry skin
  • little dream recall
  • white spots on nails (this is due to Zinc deficiency not Calcium as we all think)
  • stretch marks (who doesn’t have these especially after becoming a mother)
  • poor wound healing
  • anxiety and inner tension
  • headaches and migraines
  • tendency to stay up late (I have never been a morning person)
  • sensitive to bright lights, loud noises and smells (why I the clicking irritated me!)

There are other symptoms and traits of pyrolles though I have ticked the majority of the boxes. We all produce pyrolles, though some of us have an excess. This excess binds to vitamins B6 and zinc as well as other vitamins including manganese and B3 and leads to over excretion of these nutrients in the urine and a potential nutrient deficiency. This leads me back to my initial thoughts of nutrient deficiency triggering my postpartum psychosis.

Dr Golik continues his talk relating the symptoms and traits of pyrolles to conditions including schizophrenia, bipolar and depression. As he discussing these Pyrolle Disorder Biotypes a name keeps popping up: Dr William Walsh. Dr Walsh has a book Nutrient Power:  Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain on the power of nutrients on mental function.

Looking into this further I look up the Walsh Research Institute to find a practitioner to get tested…

Further Information

A Quirky Journey 53: Pyroluria with Jules Galloway ND

The Low Tox Life Podcast #18: Jules Galloway – Is Pyrroles the key to you feeling better?

Functional Nutrition Academy Feb 2017 Intake

Pharmacological Lactation Suppression

Contemporary models of severe psychotic forms of mental illness assume it is triggered by dysregulation of dopamine, i.e. chemical imbalance, arising from adverse interaction of predisposing risk genes and environmental factors. All successful antipsychotic agents have the ability to act as a D2 receptor antagonist (dopamine inhibitor), raising the question as to whether those with have or at risk of psychosis are susceptible to onset or exacerbation of psychosis when prescribed D2 agonists (dopamine activator).

Early postnatal period is a time of high risk for psychosis. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of postpartum psychosis are poor understood.

FDA recommends against the practice of prescribing D2 agonists (activator) due to longstanding evidence about cardiovascular disease and neurological risks.

Pharmacological Lactation Suppression with D2 Receptor Agonists and Risk of Postpartum Psychosis – Dr Josephine Power, International Marce Society Conference 2016.

Reference

Snellen et al. 2016. Pharmacological lactation suppression with D2 receptor agonists and risk of postpartum psychosis: A systematic review.

Jammed Up

The start of 2017 has not been the greatest with a few health expressions to slow me down. The first week I endured a 3 day migraine with the second day resulting in a blood shot left eye; not a particularly great look on the first week back to work. Last week I took sometime to slow down and listen to my body with another health expression. I spent time bed napping and resting with body aches, stuffy nose and a smashing headache. Soothed my razor blade throat with Zesty Mumma ginger lemon-aid (I only had oranges). I had my diffusers pumping with Twenty8 Immune Boost, body boosted with this blend as well as added a few drops to my detox Epsom salt bath. Immune Boost blend is a potent combination of Eucalyptus, Lavender, Tea Tree, Cedarwood and Pine is perfect for strengthening the body’s immune system as well as a powerful decongestant with anti-bacterial properties. Took the edge off the headache with Twenty8 peppermint EO.

With all these headaches I was having recently I really was wanting to see my chiro. 12 months ago this notion would not have even crossed my mind. I have started to see a chiropractor in May 2016 after attending the MINDD Forum and ACNEM which really made me think more about how the postural alignment impacts the state of our health. After the first few sessions my fog of fatigue lifted, the clarity of thought was remarkable, and my chiro was able to pin point areas of concern without me saying a word. My chiro noted the sore spots base of head = adrenals, spot just below my right rib cage = food intolerances, stomach = gut issues, all linked via the vagus nerve (more about this another time).

My chiro worked with my body to promote healing, ironing out the kinks, releasing the tension in my neck and shoulders and discovering a lot of tension was located at the very top of my spine, the seat of much emotion for me. With regular chiro sessions, we got my body to a physical point of wellness, and a place to be able to start working through some of the emotion that had been brought to the surface.  I started to stretch the sessions further apart as life became busy. My body soon told me what it thought of this with the return of headaches. Over the Christmas/New Year I let my sessions slip too long and I unravelled into a health expression. I was grateful for my chiro Living Health Care to see me last week and un-jam me. Now to work out what is going on in my neural tree.

Keeping up the fluids and EOs has helped with a quick recovery, as well as booking in a follow up appointment with my chiro. What tips and tricks do you do when you have a health expression?

Transmission of Trauma

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is the long lasting effects of stress. In the flight/fight response to a threat, the sympathetic nervous system is activated, adrenaline is released to cope with the stress, then cortisol is released to stop the stress response and breaks down when the threat is removed. In PTSD the cortisol levels are lower, which are a reflection of a greater dysregulation of the HPA axis, including circadian rhythm alteration, glucocorticoid receptivity and alterations in cortisol metabolism.

In trauma survivors the stress responsive can be a transformative experience. The offspring of trauma survivors, such as the Holocaust, were also more likely to experience anxiety and depression and have lower levels of cortisol associated with child adversity.

Offspring make their own changes – is this transmission or accommodation? Developmentally programmed changes allow more flexible responding but may be a mismatch for the offspring.

Intergenerational Transmission of Trauma – Epigenetic mechanisms, the in Utero Environment and Early Attachment – Dr Rachel Yehuda, International Marce Society Conference 2016.

Further reading

Yehuda & Le Doux 2007. Response variation following trauma: a translational neuroscience approach to understanding PTSD.

Yehuda & Bierer 2008. Transgenerational transmission of cortisol and PTSD risk.

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